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Welcome to "If the knit fits", the blog based home of Sheepish magazine and weekly updates of my crafty activities.

Saturday, 31 July 2010

Year of the sock, July- Show socks

This is the only time I am letting myself repeat a patterned stitch sock as I have a lot of them in my favourites and will never get them done if I keep repeating patterns.
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For my knitted garment show entry I wanted a pattern I knew came out will so I did the 9 to 5 sock pattern again using some handpainted yarn (calling the colourway currants at the minute). I switched down to a 2.25mm needle and added an extra two pattern repeats. They were well recieved- the comments card said "perfection" (that's all the self trumpeting I promise).
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Unfortunately the dark yarn is not the easiest to photograph, but here they are:
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A close up of the pattern stitch, shows the colourway better.
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On the feets:
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The first pair I made to this pattern are my absolute favourite socks, so hopefully I will get a lot of wear out of these too.

Friday, 30 July 2010

FO Friday- Squares and show entries

FO for this week was dip dyeing some DK yarn in a raspberry colourway and using it to make two 8 inch squares.
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The first is a simple mitred square:
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The second used the Pie crust pattern by Sarah Bradberry, Rav link here.
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I had some village show entries that I can't count as 52 in52 projects under my own rules because they did not really take long enough to make, so I am putting their pictures in here.

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First up origami crane earrings following the directions on this site.

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They are teeny and pretty fiddly to make, but worth it.
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There was also a greetings card category, I made two as I couldn't decide which one to go for.
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I took a family vote, they opted for entering this one, which turned out to be a good choice
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I do quite like this one for its artsiness though. The crochet flowers are from the pattern for A maiden's glory headdress, on Rav here.
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And finally the sock yarn blanket square, hand dyed yarn.
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Thursday, 29 July 2010

Techniques- 2 at a time on dpns

No photo tutorial from me this week I'm afraid due to a busy week of work. Wanted to save/share the link to two socks (or anything round) at a time on dpns in knitty ages ago.
Found that through a link on a Rav forum, have been wanting to try it out for ages but did not know how, so now I just need to get some yarn! (and an 8 day week).

Tuesday, 27 July 2010

Book review- Hand dyeing yarn and fleece

This week it is all about the book Hand dyeing yarn and fleece by Gail Callahan. Amazon linky here.
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I have not had this book long, a little over a month, and would usually wait a bit longer before doing a review so I have time to use the book quite a bit and get a feel for how useful it really is. No need with this one, I love it already!
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There is loads of info in here, and it all seems to be the useful kind of stuff that sometimes you can't find in other places. In particular for me it was the dip dyeing info that swung it, the other books I had bought did not give any details on it and I wanted to know!
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The book starts with the pretty much standrad details of setting up for dyeing, health and safety, dye types and colour. No big suprises here but nicely written with plenty of pictures to keep it interesting.
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For me the best bit of this book is the method instructions. Every step is clearly illustrated with lovely pictures and good written instructions. Although some of the methods use microwaving rather than stovetop steaming which is my preferred method it is simple to transfer the techniques across.
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Finally there are some patterns given to show off the hand dyed yarns, including the dyeing instructions (a range of methods are used across the patterns). I have not used any of these but they seem well written and clear. I would not buy the book just for the patterns as there are only eight (fine for a dyeing book, less so for a pattern book) and while nice they are not really my personal FO style.
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Price wise I paid about £8, I would definately say that is good for what I have got from the book. I can also see myself coming back to it often to try out different methods so will have got my moenys worth out of it.
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A final good point is that the book is spiral bound inside the cardboard cover. It might seem odd to mention this but it really is fantasically helpful as it means the book will lie flat on the table without having anything to hold it open. This makes it much easier to follow as you work. The only downside to this is that as you look through the first time some of the pages are a little stuck together where the holes for the bindings are. Careful separation is needed to avoid tearing. Once you have been through the book once this is not a problem.
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And since I don't like to post without pictures, some raspberry yarn dip dyed using the method in the book:
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Starting to run out of things to review, will have to get knitting or get myself to a new yarn shop!

Monday, 26 July 2010

Village show

Warning- shameful amounts of self trumpeting contained within!
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This weekend was the village show back home where my parents live. As I haven't managed to find any shows up here I entered the handicraft classes down there (I did check it was ok first). This has meant that I have been a complete PITA for the last two weeks as I frantically tried to finish (and in most cases start) all the projects for the classess I had entered.
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Managed to get them all done with only a little last minute sewing on Friday night.
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The handicraft classes covered two rows of tables in the hall:
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There was also a decorated bra competition to raise money for breast cancer, this was voted by the public- a donation got you a bean and you put it in the jar for your favourite bra. The entries were excellent, a fun contest. I think next year they are doing decorated pants (underpants/panties for non UK peoples).
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Now for the self trumpeting, feel free to skip this bit.
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I want to keep a record of what I entered. Photos of the items will follow on FO Fridays for the next month or so (frees up time for a large project as my 52in52 is taken care of).
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Pottery or ceramics- Green yarn bell
You madeit let's see it- Origami daffodills
Quilting or patchwork- Multicoloured cushion (Highly commended)
Cross stitch- Owl (3rd)
Machine sewn garment- Halterneck dress (2nd)
Jewellery- Crane earrings (1st)
Home made greetings card- Mini sock fireplace (1st)
Fashion accessory- Moebius scarf (1st)
Hand knitted garment- 9-5 socks in currants colourway (1st)
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I also won this for best handicrafts item in show:
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Unfortunately they don't tell you which item it is for, but I am guessing it was for the socks based on the comments card.
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Next year I am not leaving it till the last minute! (Heard that before, never works :D )

Friday, 23 July 2010

FOs- another baby gift and a green square

The FO this week that I am counting towards my 52 in 52 looks rather a lot like the one from last week, same yarn, same patterns. This time I added 10 rounds of ribbing to the top of the slippers to turn them into booties as I have my doubts about how well the slippers will stay on waving feet.
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This week's blanket square is made from entrelac socks leftovers, the lighter shade of green.
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I have been crafting like a mad thing for the last couple of weeks so lots more variety in the FOs for the coming few weeks.

Techniques- Making a yarn weight guide

It can be easier to decide what weight a yarn is by comparing it to others of known weight. This is especially true if you get some unlabelled stuff from a charity shop or by unravelling a knitted garment to reuse the yarn.
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To make this easier I have made up a card with samples of each.
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First up print a copy of the Yarn weights and needle sizes sheet from the sidebar. Cut it in half and stick one half to either side of a piece of card. When you are sticking make sure there is no text on the back of the sample box as it is going to have holes in.
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Punch holes in each of the boxes, I found a standard hole punch could reach them all if you work from either side.
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You can laminate the card if you want to, makes it a bit more robust but not a requirement.
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If you have laminated re punch the holes, the hole punch may not reach with the extra depth of plastic round the edges so you may need to poke them through with a needle.
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Cut lengths of yarn in each of the weights. For the thinner ones I did about a metre, folded in half twice, poked it through the correct hole to fold it again then tied an over hand knot in the whole bunch of strands.
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Repeat for all the weights, you will have to use less yarn for the thicker ones.
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Trim the ends to the same lengths
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This one is missing the chunky as I don't have any, but I'm sure some will pass through my stash at some point.

Tuesday, 20 July 2010

Tool review- Drop spindle starter kit

Something differnet to review this week, I thought I would talk about my drop spindle starter kit. I bought it from ebay about a year ago, there are a lot of similar ones available, but I went for this one.
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The kit contains an Ashford top whorl drop spindle, instruction sheet and about 100g of merino fibre in four colours.

The spindle weighs about 75g, so it is quite heavy and most suited to thicker yarns, which is fine for beginners but not as great once you get going. Although if you get into it you are likely to buy more spindles as there is a huge range of nice ones to choose from. There is a little bit of roughness to the wood on mine in a couple of places, but not much and it has not affected the spinning at all.

The instruction sheet is not great, but to be honest spindling is not really something that is easy to write down. Either having someone to show you, or looking online at YouTube type videos is an easier way to go. The instructions do make sense once you have already got the hang of it, but that is not overly helpful.

The fibre in the kit seems to spin well. I have heard suggestions that beginners should use something with a longer staple (length of flibrey fluff) than merino, but I found it to be fine. Having multiple colours is nice as you can get some interesteing stripng once you get going. 100g seems to be enough to have a decent play with and decide if you want to buy more.

The price for the kit is good, you can pay about the same for the spindle alone and with this one you get fibre to play with too. The seller also usually has a range of colours, so you can pick which one you prefer and are more likely to use.

Spindle:
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It is possible to spin thin, even on a heavy spindle, just more of a pain to join lengths of fibre together.
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In all the kit is good, it got me into spinning. I would guess that similar ones are just as good, but can only comment on the one I tried. There are lots of other alternatives for trying out spindling, like borrow one or make one from a CD and a stick; but if you want a set, or want to give one as a gift this is a good way to go.

Monday, 19 July 2010

Published, sort of!

Anyone who knows me in real life knows that I am not the girly type (in spite of the long hair and crafting tendencies. Despite this I have a subscription to the magazine Company, its is a UK women's magazine, you know the type- daft fashion, real life stories etc.
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Last month they introduced a craft page, so I thought I would email their letters page for the first time ever. Mostly because there is a prize on offer, but also secretly in the hope that they would want to see my crafty stuff and put it in their magazine. Neither of those happened, but they did publish my letter, it was suprisingly exciting!
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For those who don't know me in real life or on Ravelry, Fiona is my real name, and I promise I did write it, I didn't just see a crafting related letter by someone with the same name and steal it.
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So there you go, my first ever published thingy not exactly eloquent (in fact I think I sound like a bit of a muppet). Next stop a book! :D

Sunday, 18 July 2010

The start of Spinning Sundays

Last year I decided to try my hand at spinning, the theory being that if I spun my own yarn I would get more hours of crafting fun per project than if I bought it. I duly bought a drop spindle starter kit and had a go.
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It was something of a disaster and the drop spindle ended up being tucked away in my stash tub. (Sorry, no photos of the lumpy disaster yarn)
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A couple of months later I saw some instruction videos on YouTube and decided to have another go. Much more successful this time (eventually).
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I even managed to make enough sock weight yarn for a pair of socks.
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But drop spindling, while fun, is so very very slow- you spin, then stop, wind on, spin some more etc. And when you are going for thin stuff it takes a long time to get enough to knit with (at least for me). s
The answer, obviously was a wheel, I tried out a friend's Ashford Traveller a few months back but have been holding off on buying one. Partly because of umming and ahhing over which I wanted ( I went Traveller, Kiwi, Sonata and back and forwards between the last two repeatedly) and partly because they are not cheap.
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This week I got paid for some work, which happened to coincide with an offer from a lovely Raveller of a Kromski Sonata for a good price, how could I resist?! So here it (she/he?) is:
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I know a lot of people name their wheels but so far it is just called "Wheel", it might be a she though. Not had a lot of time yet to play as am trying to finish up a lot of projects before a show next week (more on that in the week) but am looking forward to a lot of spinning.
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So, from now on the theme for posts on Sundays is going to be spinning, you can see how the adventure goes!



Saturday, 17 July 2010

Skills check

Someone on the Midlands UK Crafters board on Ravelry posted about a list of knitting skills they had found, thought I would do a post here to see which of them I have done. Will try to remember to look back in a years time and redo it, see what else I can add. Bold text is done.
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Sorry for the long post and to the original list author if they are offended at its use.
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Afghan/BlanketAfghan- sock yarn blanket on its way, but not done yet
I-cord
Garter stitch
Knitting with metal wire
Shawl
Stockinette stitch
Socks: top-down
Socks: toe-up
Knitting with camel yarn
Mittens: Cuff-up
Mittens: Tip-down
Hat
Knitting with silk
Moebius band knitting
Participating in a KAL
Sweater
Drop stitch patterns
Knitting with recycled/secondhand yarn
Slip stitch patterns
Knitting with banana fiber yarn
Domino knitting (modular knitting)
Twisted stitch patterns
Knitting with bamboo yarn
Two end knitting
Charity knitting
Knitting with soy yarn
Cardigan
Toy/doll clothing
Knitting with circular needles
Knitting with your own handspun yarn
Slippers
Graffiti knitting (knitting items on, or to be left on the street)
Continental Knitting - on the to do list for next month or so
Designing knitted garments
Cable stitch patterns
Lace patterns
Publishing a knitting book
Scarf
American/English knitting
Knitting to make money
Button holes
Knitting with alpaca
Fair Isle knitting
Norwegian knitting
Dying with plant colors
Knitting items for a wedding
Household items (dishcloths, washcloths, tea cozies)
Knitting socks (or other small tubular items) on two circulars
Olympic knitting (albeit unsuccessful) assuming this means Ravelympics
Knitting with someone else’s handspun yarn
Knitting with DPNs
Holiday related knitting
Teaching a male how to knit
Bobbles
Knitting for a living
Knitting with cotton
Knitting smocking
Dying yarn
Steek
Knitting art
Fulling/felting
Knitting with wool
Textured knitting
Kitchener BO
Purses/bags
Knitting with beads
Swatching - he he, once!
Long Tail CO
Entrelac
Knitting and purling backwards
Machine knitting
Knitting with self-patterning/self-striping/variegating yarn
Stuffed toys
Baby items
Knitting with cashmere
Darning
Jewelry
Knitting with synthetic yarn
Writing a pattern
Gloves
Intarsia
Knitting with linen
Knitting for preemies
Tubular CO
Freeform knitting
Short rows
Cuffs/fingerless mitts/arm warmers
Pillows
Knitting a pattern from an online knitting magazine
Rug
Knitting on a loom
Thrummed knitting
Knitting a gift
Knitting for pets
Shrug/bolero/poncho
Knitting with dog/cat hair
Hair accessories
Knitting in public

Friday, 16 July 2010

Blog linkage

I am having a total computer ability fail. I want to do a link to the Wonder why alpaca farm fibre arts Friday, and I am sure there is a way to do it that looks beautiful, but I don't know how. So here is a bog standard url type linkage:
http://wonderwhyalpacafarm.blogspot.com/2010/07/fiber-arts-friday-tour-de-fleece.html
People (including me) post a link each Friday to one of their blog posts to show what they have been up to in the world of fibreyness. Then everyone can have a nosy round and see lots of posts, discover new blogs etc.

FOs- Baby gift and a square

This year seems to be year of the tiny person, there are three due during the year. It suddenly occurred to me that the first two due dates were close and I had not done a knitted gift, so I combined it with some stash busting.
The first set has been given to a member of my knitting group.
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Baby hat:
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Magic slippers :
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Sock yarn blanket square done in the same yarn:
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Thursday, 15 July 2010

Techniques- Dip dyeing, single colour, multiple shades

I recently discovered the fun that is dip dyeing, and having tried to describe the process in words to someone I thought I would share photos of the process with you this week.
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First up prepare your yarn- tie the skein in several places then soak it. It needs to be good and soggy to avoid white patches so be generous with the time you soak it for. Give it an hour or so, it can usually even be left over night- some fibres, like silk, need a lot of soaking.
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Once it is well soaked, lift it carefully out of the water and squeeze it gently to let some of the excess water out.
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Prepare your dye bath with enough water for the yarn to swim around and whichever dye you want to use according to the instructions, as these vary I will not go in to them here. If required by your dye add vinegar to the pot.
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Bring the dye bath to a simmer.
Wrap your soggy yarn around a stick that is longer than the top of your dye bath is wide (or a wooden spoon/fork is good as the flat surface of the spoon stops the stick rolling).
(The cider in the photo is not for drinking while dyeing, it just happened to be in the kitchen when I took the photo).
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Sit the stick across the top of the dye bath and unravel the first section of yarn into the dye. This will be the darkest section, how much you want to unravel is entirely up to you.
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At intervals unwind a little more yarn into the pot. Each section should come out lighter than the previous one. This one was done in four intervals, each two minutes apart, but again that is up to you depending how you want the yarn to look.
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Unless you want a white section to the end of the yarn drop the final length of yarn into the pot and give it a gentle swirl with the stick to get it under the surface. If you leave the last stage too long there will not be much dye left in the pot and it will come out very pale. That might be what you want, but if not don't leave it too long.
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Leave the pot to simmer to set the dye. This should be about fifteen minutes but may depend on the make of dye.
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Take the pot off the heat and allow to cool to room temperature.
Rinse the yarn then squeeze out the excess water and allow to dry (as for handpainting).
Twist into a pretty skein and take artistic photos on the lawn (this stage is optional :D).
Plan what to knit/gift/sell skein.
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Next dyeing adventure should be dipping for multiple colours so watch out for that one.
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I would love to see what you make if you follow this tutorial, please leave a link in the comments to pictures so I can see (why yes, I am nosy! :D).



Tuesday, 13 July 2010

Yarn review- Lion Brand Wool Ease

I am quite prepared to admit to having become some what of a yarn snob since I discovered all the lovely yarns out there in the world. However, sometimes what you need is not fancy yarn, but something practical.
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Wool ease sits nicely in this category, while still being good to work with.
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It is 80% acrylic and 20% wool, nice and soft and best of all seriously easy care. It can be machine washed and even tumbled according to the label. It is also quite affordable, about £3.50 for 85g, and has a big range of colours.
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My first contact with it was for making my first ever sweater, I think it did a pretty good job of it. The colours, price and easy care aspects were what swayed me to it.
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There is a little squeakiness as you knit, especially if you are using acrylic needles, and if you are truly adverse to acrylics you would most likely find it too shiny. Availability in the UK might be about to take a tumble as the company that imports it is closing down to move back to the U.S., they are currently having a big sale but no word on if anyone will be taking over the supply.
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I bought a bit of a mountain of it for making socks as Christmas presents, unfortunately it is not so good for socks. The ones I made last year got holes in less than six months so it has come off my sock list.
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I am thinking of making a blanket with the yarn mountain as there is not enough of each colour for a whole large project and if I stripe green and red I will look like an elf!

Monday, 12 July 2010

Swap the second

The £5 UK swap took a break in May as the lovely lady that organises it had a major computer failure. It was back for June though, so another opportunity to hunt for bargains, make up a parcel and anxiously wait for the postman. The theme this month was purple.
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My parcel arrived this morning. There's some yarn, an octopus pattern, a needle sizer, biscuits, face masks, foldable shopping bag, fibre to spin, lavender pouches and a knitting monkey card.
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The lavender bags are already in my stash, hopefully helping to protect it from beasties (no signs of damage btw so maybe it was not a clothes moth I saw).
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I sent this:
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You might recognise the roving, mousey and mini sock, they have all popped up in blogland before. The radishes were the most random purpley thing I have seen so I could not resist them, fortunately my swap partner says she has somewhere to plant them!
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Looking forward to next month's swap already.


Sunday, 11 July 2010

If there's fibre I will find it!

Ok, so it was not exactly hidden, it was sitting in a tent waiting to be bought.
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We went to another show today, the Asby de la Zouch agricultural show. Lots of different animals to see this time- sheep, cattle, alpacas, horses, rabbits, ferrets, dogs as well as lots of other things to look at like dancing diggers, craft and food tents, show jumping and trade stands.
Sheep, of course:
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Alpaca with attitude: "You looking at me?!"
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Is it normal to look at anything fluffy and think "I wonder if I could spin that"?
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I got excited when I rounded the corner in one of the craft tents and saw a line up of spinners with wheels, a big display of handspun yarn and knitted items. No fibre though (sob!). The second time round I had a nice chat with a couple of them, they let me pet some silk roving, gave me the name of a rovings suppliers and told me that I should go to Woolfest in Cumbria next year (I think all spinners are enablers!).
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Fortunately there was another small stall selling some roving and yarn. Most of the fibre was unlabelled so I opted for a 50g bunch of Cheviot x Border Leicester. The label says it is by Moro Rovings.
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Finally a stroll over to the WI craft competition, I eyed up the hand knit socks and was very interesting to read the comment cards, think the competitions are not open to non members though.
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Friday, 9 July 2010

FOs- Mousey and square

This week's FO is actually the one for last week and vice versa. I posted them that way round as this little chap was a suprise for my swap partner and her cat in the £5 swap for June. Didn't want to spoil the suprise by blogging a picture before the parcel got to her in the post.
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This mousey is based on the one in the Stitch and Bitch Nation book, but I converted it to be knit in the round and made the body and tail in one piece. Was going to stuff him with wool scraps but did not want to encourage the cat to develop a taste for wool so went with toy stuffing.
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He is a bit small to be a project all by himself but I am going to let him (after all they are my rules so I guess I can break them :D).
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And of course the obligatory sock yarn blanket square, a nice bright red this week left over from my fire socks.
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Thursday, 8 July 2010

Techniques- Let's talk about socks baby

I wanted to make that the title as it causes a little imature giggle from me, which is always fun.
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As everyone knows I like socks about as much as Badger loves mashed potatoes (which is a lot, sorry obscure 90s UK TV reference to Bodger and Badger, if you know what I am talking about you will be singing the song). So I thought I would make the socky wisdom I have collected so far into today's post.
  • For top down cast on loosely, a single cast on is good (needle in the right hand, make loops with the left) as it makes loops rather than actual stitches.
  • For bottom up cast off REALLY loosely, like comedy loose- go up several needle sizes or make loops with the needles you were using. Finding you have cast off too tightly and can't get the sock on is frustrating (go on, ask me how I know).
  • Try top down and toe up, you will probably like one better than the other but at least you will know.
  • Do a decent length of ribbing at the top if you want it to stay put, 15 rounds is good for me but it depends on your gauge etc.
  • If you do a pair of plain socks you can use it as the basis for your gauge next time you use that yarn/needles as the gauge is often given for stocking stitch in the round even on fancy patterns.
  • Using a chunky yarn and simple pattern to make boot socks is a good place to start (one like the super simple knitwit sock pattern is good).
  • Mini socks are also a good way to start if you are ok with slightly fiddly, all the steps of a big sock are in there without the commitment of lots of stitches.
  • For a more complicated pattern the 9 to 5 sock is great and no worries about getting the fit around the foot as it is super stretchy.
  • A bit of negative ease around the foot is good (smaller width of knitting than actual distance around foot), keeps it snug. Ribbing can help here.
  • Make the foot the actual length of your foot, if it is too short it will either pull the heel under when wearing, which is not comfy or the toe will rub through faster.
  • There are lots of ways to make the elements of socks, try different ones to see which works best for you.
  • Use a yarn that will not wear through too quickly, dying from lots of wear is fine, dying after three wears is disappointing.
  • Holes can be fixed by darning, reknitting sections or making the wearer a new pair.
  • Handknit socks are for wearing, not for looking at!

I in no way think I have collected all the sock based wisdom there is so at some point there will be another part to this.

Wednesday, 7 July 2010

Oh noes!

A MOTH! THERE WAS A MOTH! In my craft room (formerly called the spare room). I thought clothes moths were tiny but it seems that is a relative term and this may indeed have been a yarn threat and I left it there, ARGH!!! I am going to see if it is still there and then, um I don't know. Most of my wool is in plastic bags then in a plastic tub. I hope that is enough protection!

Tuesday, 6 July 2010

Yarn review- Wendy Happy

A while back I bought two balls of Wendy Happy because I fancied trying out some bamboo yarn- I had heard it was meant to be good for temperature regulation and naturally antibacterial, figured thst would be excellent for socks.
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The yarn is 75% bamboo and 25% nylon, it has a suprisingly silky feel, coupled with a sort of cottoniness (yes, today I am making up words!).
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I was ready to give this a somewhat unenthusiastic review, having made two pairs of socks and not been blown away by them- in particular I found the ribbing did not hold up very well. However, I used the last ball up making some baby gift items in an attempt to destash and have had a definite change of heart. The items have knit up nicely, amd I am particularly pleased with the Pisces colourway I used.
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The yarn does tend to be somewhat splitty, especially if it has been untwisted a little, for example during the cast on, however this is not too bad it just needs to be watched while knitting.
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Pricewise it is pretty reasonable with a 100g ball for between five and six pounds, more affordable than a lot of sock yarns. Quite a few colourways are available, although they do all seem to have some degree of striping and/or varigation.
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The patterning shows up really well on this baby hat, knitted with the Pisces colourway:
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Having had a good experience the second time round I would be tempted to buy the yarn again but would not use it for socks, it makes nice baby gifts and might work on scarves and shawls depending on the arrangement of the varigation.


Sunday, 4 July 2010

Woolfest Leicestershire style

Today was a very exciting day- my first ever Woolfest!
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Beacon Hill near Loughborough decided to hold a mini woolfest this year, it was a good turn out with spinning demos, knitting lessons, refreshments, peg looms, feltmaking and weaving.
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For me the highlight was a walk up to where they keep their sheep and two guard alpacas. The sheep were not feeling overly sociable, but these two stayed around to investigate. The sheep are used to graze the grassland, the alpacas look after them and stop them being hassled by dogs. I even got to hand feed the brown one a few sheep nuts, it was very much cupboard love on his part- as soon as the food was gone he lost interest and there was to be none of that head rubbing or anything!
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Of course there was the opportunity to buy things, I just resisted buying a fleece from one the park's sheep (only because I could not think what to do with a fleece worth of manx yarn), but sucumbed to the fibre stall. I went for a handful of every different type of fibre they had, ranging from alpaca to crab. Only a little of each, just to try them out, once I get started I will post pictures and reviews of each type.
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The show was kept quite small this year as it was the first year, but it sounds like it will grow so one to put in the diary for next year.